What is MAC Anesthesia?

MAC stands for Monitored Anesthesia Care. MAC is not necessarily a type of anesthesia but more of a
style of anesthesia.

Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) includes all aspects of anesthesia care, a pre-procedure visit, intra-procedure care and post-procedure anesthesia management. While MAC may include the administration of sedatives and analgesics often used for Moderate Sedation, the MAC provider must be prepared and qualified to convert to general anesthesia when necessary.

Sedation With MAC Anesthesia

MAC allows for the safe administration of maximal depth of sedation. MAC provides the ability to adjust sedation levels from full consciousness to general anesthesia during the course of a procedure; this flexibility provides matching sedation levels for the patient and proceduralist requirements to achieve ideal procedural conditions.

During a MAC procedure, if the patient loses consciousness and the ability to respond purposefully, the anesthesia care by definition is converted to a general anesthetic regardless of whether airway instrumentation is required.

MAC Anesthesia Post-Procedure Care

MAC anesthesia requires post-procedure care such as return to full consciousness, relief of pain, psychological support and physical comfort as well as the diagnosis and treatment of co-existing medical problems.

Monitored Anesthesia Care is a physician service that must be provided by a qualified anesthesia provider, it should be subject to the same level of payment as general anesthesia.

Did You Know It’s CRNA Week?

crna

Every anesthesia practice depends on a team effort to serve its patients. One key part of this team effort is a practice’s Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs), who perform essential (and often thankless) tasks to help patients with their healthcare needs.

This week, it’s National CRNA Week – a time to commemorate the hard work CRNAs all over the country perform on behalf of their valued patients.

What Does a CRNA Do?

A CRNA is a nurse who specializes in providing anesthetic care to a patient. CRNAs have graduate-level education and board certification in anesthesia. It is estimated that across the country, CRNAs administer roughly 34 million anesthetic procedures each year.

A CRNA works closely with anesthesiologists, other CRNAs, or physicians – such as surgeons – providing medical direction to the nurse. The amount of independence a CRNA has varies by state, but most are capable of handling anesthetic procedures with minimal supervision or direction.

If you’ve ever had surgery, chances are a CRNA was involved. The amount of dedication it takes to go through that much schooling – much of it complex and advanced – is a testament to how much care your average CRNA puts into his or her job.

(In the military, most anesthetic care is provided by CRNAs. They’re often some of the first providers for our service men and women after injury.)

Showing Appreciation to CRNAs

This week is the time to take note of what CRNAs do for practices all across the country, and how patient care is better because of their presence.

For more information, check out the official Facebook page of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Also, don’t forget to recommend a top-performing CRNA for annual awards from the AANA Foundation. Nominations are due by March 31, 2016.

Be sure to thank a CRNA this week as we celebrate this honored profession and these dedicated professionals.

Pros of Outsourcing Your Medical Billing

icd 10

Outsourcing your medical billing and coding can be a great choice for your practice. The fact that you can expect an immediate 5 to 15% increase in the amount you collect may be enough to make you choose outsourcing over in-house billing.

However, if you are still on the fence, Medical Business Management wants to share some of the other benefits of outsourcing your medical billing and coding.

Staffing Issues are Never a Problem

If your practice has a high staff turnover then it will negatively impact your medical billing process and cause your revenue to suffer. When you outsource your medical billing you solve that problem.

Furthermore, when you outsource you don’t have to keep a dedicated billing specialist on your staff, which saves you money. You don’t have to worry about paying for training, salary, or insurance costs.

In short, it is much less expensive to outsource your medical billing than it is to hire a billing department for your practice or hospital.

Outsourcing is Easy and Convenient

When you outsource your medical billing, the billing company takes care of all the medical coding, data entry, claim filing, payment posting, follow-up and statements. They generally charge you a fee that is a percentage of the collected amount. Your staff doesn’t have to worry about this process and can devote their time and energy to caring for your patients.

Have a claim get denied? Medical Business Management will take care of that too!

We will take care of appealing and resubmitting any claims that are wrongly denied. We will also handle collections and pursue accounts that are past due.

Finally, your practice will not have to purchase expensive software, pay for network installation, and then have to likely pay for training on its use.

Choose the easy and convenient solution: Outsource your medical billing and coding to Medical Business Management!

ICD-10 is Rolling Out in October

ICD-10 is the new medical coding system that will be rolling out in October of 2015. There are over 60,000 new diagnosis codes alone! Add in the thousands of new procedure and treatment codes and you may start to feel a bit overwhelmed.

Errors in coding could slow down your reimbursement process considerably, causing you to face penalties or make you miss payments entirely.

If your practice is not fully prepared for ICD-10, then talk with our expert coders. At Medical Business Management, our coders have been thoroughly trained on the new coding system and are ready to implement it for your practice, ensuring you are ready for the big change.

Is Outsourcing Right for Your Practice? Call Medical Business Management Today!

If you are looking for an easy and convenient medical billing process, contact Medical Business Management today!

Our highly trained staff of medical coders and billing specialists are ready to make your practice as efficient and successful as possible.

Bundled Payments

There are a number of developments occurring to implement national healthcare and central to the remittance scheme is bundled payments. Other names for bundled payments are; episode based payments; evidence based case rate, global bundled payments and package pricing. I like bundled payments.

Many healthcare reformers believe that the solution to the “fee for service” model, which rewards physicians for performing activities or services, is to “bundle” payments around a particular health problem. This is not a new idea. Medicare proposed and implemented a demonstration project to bundle payments for heart bypass surgery in 1990. That project showed that bundled payments could work well (for heart by-pass surgery). The benefits were to reduce costs, patients had better survival rates, and shorter hospital stays were part of the results.

So, why hasn’t there been a wider acceptance of these ideas, and adoption of the concept across a number of other specialties? There are reasons, but the largest one is to determine how the bundled payment will be divided in a fair and equitable manor among the multiple providers for a single episode of service. The second reason is the difficulty of “standardizing” an episode of service.

Think of this, the grocery store where you shop is paid $150 for each full buggy (a patient’s episode of services). Each item in the buggy represents a healthcare service or activity by a provider. The grocery store receives the bundled payment and now must divide the $150 and pay it to each provider of service.

Do you think that there will be a few broken eggs and a lot of spilled milk!

New Year and expected Healthcare changes

Welcome to MBM web site and we wish you a happy and prosperous 2011. I wonder what will happen to the health care industry this year?

At 12 o’clock today (Jan 5, 2010) the 112th Congress will be “called to order.” Surely their agenda will include reductions in government spending. In my opinion, that should be their whole agenda.

In the early 1990s when our company was small and struggling, we operated by borrowing money. Today, we have a balanced budget, we don’t borrow money and we are not struggling. The US government began deficit spending in 19xx and continues to borrow and continue to struggle at a more desperate rate. The recent extreme deficit spending by the 111th Congress seems to have skewed our national priorities of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Meanwhile, the lame-duck Congress did pass a one-year-Medicare pay-fix that was signed by President Obama before January 1, 2010. This legislation averted the looming 24% pay cut for physicians and non-physician providers. It represents “breathing time,” and a time for the new Congress to begin a rational and cost effective approach to “control” health care spending.

Welcome to the MBM blog page

Welcome to Medical Business Management’s blog page. As a medical billing and collections service for many health care providers and hospitals, we come across a wide variety of health care payment issues. These include; provider credentialing, coding, fee schedules, payer issues, billing techniques, revenue cycle processes and a slew of provider productivity verse payment concerns.

If that isn’t enough, along comes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obama Care. Changes have already begun under this law and future changes will radically affect the entire healthcare industry and all who work in it. Change is good if it continues the quality of care and makes the health care system more efficient and cost effective. I am not of the opinion that the new health care laws meet those standards.

In this blog, MBM will present, mostly, healthcare revenue cycle issues, changes, and ideas. We will relate it to our experiences and link to sources. Please join our blog; state your point of view or ask questions of our professional staff.

What is MAC Anesthesia?

MAC stands for Monitored Anesthesia Care. MAC is not necessarily a type of anesthesia but more of a style of anesthesia. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) includes all aspects of anesthesia care, a pre-procedure visit, intra-procedure care and post-procedure anesthesia management. While MAC may include the administration of sedatives and analgesics often used for Moderate Sedation, […]

Did You Know It’s CRNA Week?

Every anesthesia practice depends on a team effort to serve its patients. One key part of this team effort is a practice’s Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs), who perform essential (and often thankless) tasks to help patients with their healthcare needs. This week, it’s National CRNA Week – a time to commemorate the hard work […]

Bundled Payments

There are a number of developments occurring to implement national healthcare and central to the remittance scheme is bundled payments. Other names for bundled payments are; episode based payments; evidence based case rate, global bundled payments and package pricing. I like bundled payments. Many healthcare reformers believe that the solution to the “fee for service” […]

Welcome to the MBM blog page

Welcome to Medical Business Management’s blog page. As a medical billing and collections service for many health care providers and hospitals, we come across a wide variety of health care payment issues. These include; provider credentialing, coding, fee schedules, payer issues, billing techniques, revenue cycle processes and a slew of provider productivity verse payment concerns. […]